Morton vs Bradford

Comparison Morton versus the Puritan view William Bradford was the leader of one of the earliest colonial settlements in the United States, of which Thomas Morton was a settler. Bradford documented his exploits in “Of Plymouth Plantation” to gain support from his home country and fellow colonists. Bradford’s work, however, differs from Morton’s “New English Canaan” which also describes the events which took place in the colonies and his views of the Cavaliers, the Indians, and the Pilgrims.

Bradford applies his rhetoric to amplify God to respectfully reduce his poor mistreated people while Morton uses his to satirize those same people and to show off the superiority of his own learning. The contrast between Bradford and Morton can be not only to found the relation of the two authors and the nature of their rhetoric, but elevate essential moral questions about the whole colonial endeavor, particularly with respect to the Indians. Thomas Morton was born around 1576 in Devon; England.

He was a lawyer, writer and social reformer, popular for founding the colony of Merrymount and his work studying Native American culture. Morton wrote New English Canaan, which was his only work that got published. New English Canaan is separated in three books. The first was about the Indians of New England, and reports and speculates on their languages, beliefs etc. The second book explains the natural resources of New England. And, the third was about the lives of the Puritans and their problems with the residents of Ma-re-Mount.

Morton was not a religious man. Also, Morton was viewed with hostility by the pilgrims of nearby Plymouth and other settlements, who considered their reveling and association with the local Indians to be immoral. He sold liquors and firearms to the natives to injure the trade of Plymouth and to endanger the safety of the colonists. The Puritans viewed the Indians as savages. That was why he was arrested and sent to England. The Puritans said Morton worst sin was to have fun with the native women and encourage the men to do the same.

Morton renamed the colony from Mt Wollaston to “Merrymount” or Ma-re Mount. Morton’s readers recognized him as a Cavalier, which refers to English people who supported the authority of the king and the Church of England. However, it opposed the political and religious changes supported by the Puritans. Morton has been ignored by critics since his New English Canaan was published. Some have proposed that suppression of his work and plans has been a straight result of his conflict with the Puritan philosophy that became the dominant tradition of thought in American history and literature.

Morton demonstrates how the Indians hold on to a natural religion maintained by the virtues of hospitality to strangers and respect for authority. The Indians rather have fun. And, Morton share with them the traditional celebration of “Saints days”, that is how Morton put up the infamous maypole. Morton was very liberal, he wrote in “The Song” “Make greene garlons, bring bottles out And fill sweet Nectar freely about. Uncover thy head and feare no harme, For hers good liquor to keepe it warme”. (p. 327) Also, he declares that the Puritans express disapproval of natural pleasure.

Bradford wrote “Of Plymouth Plantation”, in which he criticizes Morton ways. William Bradford was born on March, 19 1590 in Austerfield, Yorkshire. He was the leader of the Separatist settlers of the Plymouth Colony in Massachusetts. The Puritans established the Plymouth Colony in 1620 in Massachusetts. The colony was who the Puritans were, or what they believed. Bradford was affected from the Puritans beliefs. William Bradford revealed the Puritans philosophy in “Of Plymouth Plantation”. William Bradford exposed how Puritans could overcome problems in many quotes in “of Plymouth Plantation”.

For instance, he wrote “ Being thus arrived in good harbor, and brought safe to land, they fell upon their knees and blessed the God of Heaven who brought them over the vast and furious ocean, and belivered them from all the perils and miseries thereof, again to set their feet on the firm and stable earth, their proper element”(p. 352). Bradford explained why people came to the New World in Chapter XXIII from his book, “And other still, as they conceived themselves straitened or to want accommodation, broke away under one pretence or other, thinking their own conceived necessity and the example of others a warrant sufficient for them.

And this I fear will be the ruin of New England, at least of the churches of God there, and will provoke the Lord’s displeasure against them. The Puritans were very religious. Everything that happened was because of God for them. Bradford wrote in Chapter XXIX “Great and Fearful Earthquake”. In this chapter he talked about how the earthquake was a sign from God to leave where they used to stay. Bradford has some prejudice toward Morton because he was taking some of the Puritans away and, because of the relationship Morton had with the Indians.

Bradford Called Morton “the Lord of Misrule”, and mentioned that Morton retained a “School of Atheism”. In Chapter XIX “Thomas Morton of Merrymount” of “Of Plymouth Plantation”, Bradford showed how his Puritan beliefs influence his understanding of events. His hate for Morton was in the whole chapter. In conclusion, Bradford and Morton had two different styles. Morton’s view was more liberal, tolerant, while Bradford was more religious. However, both authors had attracted the reader’s attention and their views of the Puritans and the Indians.