Evaluation of Change Process Essay

Abstract

In the past the National Protective Services has employed the use of in-time in their accounting MYOB as to process the invoices of their customers the manual way. However, the company is in the process of replacing this manual data invoicing with a new technology, Powerforce which is expected to automate the invoicing process. Besides rostering the manpower with its integrated invoicing system, the new technology, Powerforce is also expected to streamline the operations at National Protective Services. It is resulting from this imminent change that this paper examines the way National Protective Services, a leading company in the provision of security solutions will undertake the evaluation of the change process on their own.

Table of Contents

Introduction. 4

The Organization’s Own Evaluation of Change Process. 4

Lewin’s Model of Change. 5

Unfreezing. 5

Movement 5

Refreezing. 6

Conclusion. 6

References. 8

Introduction
National Protective Services is a leading security company in Melbourne. The company boats of about 21 years in operation besides successively being rated the best in customer service for close to ten years. It is important that the organization understands the best way of evaluating the change process it is about to undertake, since change is something that no organization can avoid because of the fact that it affects not only the managers but also the employees of the organization (Francesco & Gold 2005). Change management is also part and parcel of the overall strategic management of the organizations (Clark, 2001).

The Organization’s Own Evaluation of Change Process
Before examining the way they will evaluate the change process, the management of National Protective Services will have to understand the basic principles of evaluating change. First, the management of National Protective Services will have to realize that is their responsibility to initiate change (Francesco & Gold 2005). In the same way, they will have to realize that those people who are closest to change will need to initiate the processes at those lower levels of management. The third principle of change evaluation that they will need to understand is that fact that the entire National Protective Services will have to change once the change process will have been initiated (Francesco & Gold 2005).

            Interestingly, the management of National Protective Services will also need to realize that not the entire organization will need to change (Francesco & Gold 2005).What this implies is that in as much as the entire organization will need to embrace the change, the organization will still be expected to retain the sound practices and culture that it has been practicing since these will still act as its main sources of competitive edge (Porter 1985). Finally, the management of National Protective Services will need to know that new technology and the organizational human resources would have a vital role to play in the change evaluation.

Lewin’s Model of Change
Unfreezing
One of the most common and effective models for implementing and evaluating change is Lewin’s Model of Change (Lewin 1958). This model has been found to be effective owing to the three sequential stages that it uses in evaluating change. The first stage is unfreezing (Francesco & Gold 2005). This stage would require the management of National Protective Services to undertake a diagnosis of the requirements by way of consulting externally, and internal auditing.

            Similarly, the management will also be expected to surpass its objectives besides undertaking a detailed planning (Francesco & Gold 2005). For instance, the management of National Protective Services hopes that the new software Powerforce will not just act as a replacement for the old Intime system that has been in place before but that the new system will go along way in streamlining the operations of the organization. In this regard, the new system will be regarded successful if it surpasses those expectations and acts as a strong source of competitive advantage (Porter 1985).

Movement
This is the second step in the Lewin’s change evaluation model.(Lewin 1958) In this regard, the management of National Protective Services will have to implement the plans or recommendations that they believe will support the change process (Francesco & Gold 2005). In the same way, the management will also be expected to include an agent of change in spearheading the entire project of implementing the change process (Orlikowski & Hofman 1997). As was earlier noted from the principles, the change agents that will have to be incorporated in the evaluation process are the human resources and the available technology since the two would go along way in supporting the change process (Francesco & Gold 2005).

Refreezing
Refreezing is the final procedure in Lewin’s model of change. (Lewin 1958). In this regard, the management of National Protective Services will need to make the changes being undertakes to be routine in nature (Francesco & Gold 2005). This will involve the management carrying it the measurement of the effects of the system with the intention of making corrective adjustments. At the same time, the management will have to implement measures aimed at sustaining change on a continual basis. This means that the management of National Protective Services will need to ensure that such changes are implemented in continual basis.

Conclusion
The other important thing in the evaluation of change process is time orientations. The management of National Protective Services will need to undertake the evaluation in based on time orientations (Francesco & Gold 2005). This is for the reason that organizational cultures react to changes in different ways just like some employees are likely to resist or embrace the change process. Therefore, the management of National Protective Services will have to be prepared to manage resistance to change. Various cultures perceive time in various ways. While the cultures with past orientations stress on traditions and beliefs, the cultures that are presently oriented cultures will stress on the present. Finally, the future oriented cultures will stress on planning and the things that the organization is likely to gain.

References
Clark, S. 2001, Information Systems Strategic Management: An Integrated Approach.

            London, Routledge.

Francesco, A. M., & Gold, B. A. 2005, International Organization Behavior,

2nd ed Pearson Prentice Hall: Upper Saddle River, New Jersey.

Lewin, K. 1958, “Group decision and social change,” in Readings in Social Psychology,

eds.E. E. Maccoby, T. M. Newcomb, and E. L.Hartley, Holt, Rinehart and Winston, New York, pp. 197–211.

Orlikowski, W. J. & Hofman, J. D. 1997, An Improvisational Model for

Change Management: The Case of Groupware Technologies, Sloan Management Review, vol.38, no. 2.

Porter, M.E. 1985, Competitive Advantage: Creating and Sustaining Superior

            Performance, Free Press, New York.